(Pic via offkstreet.blogspot.com)
Recently I saw a local news story about an undocumented immigrant who was weeks away from marrying a US citizen, but was stopped for a traffic violation. She was arrested and was held in a detention center.
I was talking about it with my girlfriend and she made the assertion that holding her was making some private company very rich. I was sort of skeptical, yet aware of the private prison business in the US. And then I saw this article:

In 2011, nearly half the beds in the nation’s civil detention system were in private facilities with little federal oversight, up from just 10 percent a decade ago.

How much is the Federal Bureau of Prisons spending:

Now, the agency is paying the private companies $5.1 billion to hold more than 23,000 criminal immigrants through 13 contracts of varying lengths.

What is normally called corruption, but passes for free speech in the US:

An AP review of Federal Election Commission data found the prison companies and their employees gave to key congressional leaders who control how much money goes to run the nation’s detention centers and who influence how many contracts go to the private sector.

And finally the bogus argument about the cost effectiveness of the private sector:

But ICE Executive Associate Director for Enforcement and Removal Operations Gary Mead said the government has never studied whether privatizing immigrant detention saves money.

(Pic via offkstreet.blogspot.com)

Recently I saw a local news story about an undocumented immigrant who was weeks away from marrying a US citizen, but was stopped for a traffic violation. She was arrested and was held in a detention center.

I was talking about it with my girlfriend and she made the assertion that holding her was making some private company very rich. I was sort of skeptical, yet aware of the private prison business in the US. And then I saw this article:

In 2011, nearly half the beds in the nation’s civil detention system were in private facilities with little federal oversight, up from just 10 percent a decade ago.

How much is the Federal Bureau of Prisons spending:

Now, the agency is paying the private companies $5.1 billion to hold more than 23,000 criminal immigrants through 13 contracts of varying lengths.

What is normally called corruption, but passes for free speech in the US:

An AP review of Federal Election Commission data found the prison companies and their employees gave to key congressional leaders who control how much money goes to run the nation’s detention centers and who influence how many contracts go to the private sector.

And finally the bogus argument about the cost effectiveness of the private sector:

But ICE Executive Associate Director for Enforcement and Removal Operations Gary Mead said the government has never studied whether privatizing immigrant detention saves money.